For expats moving to Uzbekistan, the country's desert sands and awe-inspiring mountain peaks make for a fascinating landscape to explore. While it may not the most conventional of expat destinations, Uzbekistan certainly has its own unique brand of charm and can offer an interesting and enlightening stay for the open-minded.

Though the expat community in Uzbekistan is relatively small, the country's strong economy continues to draw foreigners looking for career progression. Thanks to the Uzbek government’s efforts, the country's GDP is steadily increasing year by year. The main drivers of the Uzbek economy are gas, oil and gold, and most expats work as senior management professionals in one of these industries.

The official language of the country is Uzbek, although Russian is also spoken by some. Few Uzbek people speak fluent English, so a basic knowledge of Uzbek or Russian is recommended. Those planning on living in Uzbekistan for an extended period should consider enrolling in a local language course to make the transition smoother.

The rate of crime in Uzbekistan is generally quite low, and violent crime is rare. However, street crime is on the rise in big cities, especially in the capital, Tashkent. Expats should exercise caution late at night and on public transport, where most pickpocketing incidents occur.

Healthcare in Uzbekistan isn't on par with standards in Western Europe or North America and there's a serious shortage of doctors and medical facilities. While the Uzbek government is trying to reform the medical system, it's best for expats to seek treatment in private hospitals. Many expats travel abroad for more complex medical procedures.

Expat families relocating to Uzbekistan with children should keep in mind that there are only a handful of international schools in the country.

While most Uzbeks are Muslim, Uzbekistan is a very tolerant nation, so expats shouldn’t have any difficulties practising their religion freely here. Regardless, expats should always demonstrate respect for local etiquette and should dress modestly.


Fast facts

Population: About 32 million

Capital city: Tashkent 

Neighbouring countries: Kazakhstan to the north, Kyrgyzstan to the east, Tajikistan to the southeast, Afghanistan to the south and Turkmenistan to the southwest.

Geography: As a result of its geographic position, Uzbekistan is an extremely dry country and is primarily comprised of desert terrain with some mountainous areas.

Political system: Unitary presidential constitutional secular republic

Major religions: Islam

Main languages: Uzbek and Russian

Money: The local currency is the Uzbekistani som (UZS). Uzbekistan is still very much a cash-based society, so bank cards are not commonly used. ATMs are scarce, and those that are available malfunction often.

Tipping: It isn't common or expected to tip in Uzbekistan. Some upmarket restaurants may add a 10 percent service fee to the bill.

Time: GMT+5 

Electricity: 220 volts, 50 Hz. Plugs with two rounded pins are used throughout the country.

Internet domain: .uz

International dialing code: +998

Emergency contacts: 101 (fire), 102 (police), 103 (ambulance)

Transport and driving: Cars drive on the right-hand side of the road in Uzbekistan. In Tashkent, local public transport consists of taxis, buses, trolleybuses, trams and trains.